Sunday, October 2, 2016

'Lost Generations' and other titles from Bullfrog Films now available on NJVID

'Lost Generations' and other videos from Bullfrog Films are the latest titles digitized by NJVID team this week. The content includes topics such as children's health, religious freedom and more. These titles can now be licensed by any NJVID member for streaming access. The complete titles in this list are:
  • Lost Generations - The Holdsworth Memorial Hospital in Mysore, India, has maintained records of the sizes of all the babies born in its maternity department since 1934, allowing health researchers unique access to a large cross section of the population now in middle age. Worryingly, the data shows that adults born with low birth weight are more likely to suffer from coronary heart disease in later life -- while another long-term study of 8-year-old children demonstrates clear links between fetal growth and retarded development later in life. Dr. Caroline Fall is an epidemiologist from Southampton University in the UK, who is in charge of coordinating global research into the long-term effects of low birth weight on health and development. 
  • An Act of Faith: The Phelophepa Health Train - Lillian Cingo has one great luxury in her life -- a mini whirlpool to soak her sore feet. It's a small self-indulgence for a woman who spends all day on her feet, from dawn to dusk. Lillian's job is, literally, to keep her hospital on track. She's the manager of the Phelophepa health train that spends nine months each year touring the poorest, most remote areas of South Africa. This Life program catches up with the train in the province of KwaZulu Natal, where there's just one doctor for every 4,000 people. With a full contingent of volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists and health educators on board, the "Good Clean Health Train" delivers quality health care to deprived rural communities.
  • In the Light of Reverence -  Across the USA, Native Americans are struggling to protect their sacred places. Religious freedom, so valued in America, is not guaranteed to those who practice land-based religion. Every year, more sacred sites - the land-based equivalent of the world's great cathedrals - are being destroyed. Strip mining and development cause much of the destruction. But rock climbers, tourists, and New Age religious practitioners are part of the problem, too. The biggest problem is ignorance. This title tells the story of three indigenous communities and the land they struggle to protect: the Lakota of the Great Plains, the Hopi of the Four Corners area, and the Wintu of northern California.
  • From Docklands to Dhaka -  Sam Everington is an MD in Bromley-by-Bow, one of the poorest districts of London. 40% of his patients are from Bangladesh. Sam passionately believes community health involves not just treating illness, but working with local people on jobs, housing, and education. But with far worse poverty back in Bangladesh, Sam has always wondered whether lessons learned in London will work across the globe. In this video Sam travels to Bangladesh for the first time to try and find out.
  • India Inhales -  Every day in India, another 55,000 children start smoking -- compared to the 3,000 children who take up the habit in the US, where numbers are falling. Tobacco is one of India's favorite pastimes: Indians spit it, chew it, smoke it, roll it everywhere, throughout the continent. And, inspired by advertising for Wills cigarettes which sponsors the Indian cricket team, children believe that smoking improves cricketing techniques. Hardly surprising, then, that with declining markets in the West, and 50% of India's population under the age of 25, the major tobacco companies are increasingly targeting India as their new growth market. This video explores the cynicism of the major global tobacco companies' campaigns in India, and the work of the activists who have pledged to try to stop them -- and halt the soaring increase in cancer cases in India that result from smoking.

All titles can be licensed from Bullfrog Films at Elizabeth@bullfrogfilms.com

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